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Gavin's new commentary on Wright situation in email with Dan Kaminsky • /btc
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Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoNewsandTalk [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCluster [link] [comments]

Craig Wright The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

Craig Wright: The Real Satoshi Or The Real Scammer

Today we will focus on Craig Wright, the person who took the liberty to declare himself as true Satoshi Nakamoto and who tries to take all the credit of the creator of Bitcoin, the main cryptocurrency.
Bitcoin is considered to be one of the progressive forms of payments — absolutely transparent, distributed and resistant to external influence. Its creator must be at least a genius, and most importantly, a billionaire — because a significant amount of Bitcoins mined in the early stages of the project is concentrated in his hands. It is known that Satoshi Nakamoto retired from the project around 2010 and no one knows exactly who is he really is.
In December 2015, two American publications — Gizmodo and Wired — published huge investigations aimed at finding a man who has been hiding under the name of Satoshi Nakamoto since 2008. Clues led journalists to Craig Wright, a 45-year-old entrepreneur from Australia, which on many grounds could be reckoned as a true Satoshi. For example, there were publications about the ideas of a decentralized payment system similar to Bitcoin in Wright’s blog in 2008, a year before Satoshi Nakamoto himself created BTC. Another interesting fact is that in 2013 he invested more than one million BTC in the project to create his Bitcoin Bank — supposedly only the creator of Bitcoin could own such amount of coins.
In correspondence with the publications, Craig indirectly confirmed that he is Nakamoto. At the same time, in December, 2015, Wright said that he was not going to talk about himself publicly. But almost six months later Craig Wright appeared on the front pages. Unexpectedly for many, Craig decides to give an interview to the BBC and The Economist, in which once again, but already publicly assures that he is Satoshi Nakamoto. As the main proof, Wright provided a “cryptographic signature” from the private key used in the first Bitcoin transactions by Satoshi Nakamoto himself.
Since then, Dr. Wright did not give up his words and continued to tell everyone that he is Satoshi. Later Craig said that he would sue anyone who slanders him and generally denies his merits in the creation of Bitcoin.
And while he was just talking around declaring himself as the creator of BTC — all this was tolerated and ignored. But when Wright began to threaten all who disagreed with his lies, the crypto-community decided to teach him a lesson.
Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao wrote the following on his Twitter:
“Craig Wright is not Satoshi. Anymore of this sh!t, we delist!”
His example was followed by some other exchanges, like ShapeShift and Kraken, which also announced the delisting of BSV.
Blogger and ex-hacker Nik Cubrilovic and cybersecurity researcher Dan Kaminsky published their own investigations in which Wright is exposed as a great deceiver. Enthusiasts also investigated the activities of Wright and his companies. It turned out that the purpose of the existence of many of them was to draw tax refunds and the operation of other benefits that are provided to companies focused on research activities.
When an entrepreneur’s business started to decline and companies have earned an unpleasant reputation, Wright decides to appear before the public as Satoshi Nakamoto. According to Cubrilovic’s opinion, this could improve Craig’s affairs, attract new investments and add excitement since it is known that Nakamoto owns large amounts of Bitcoins.
Craig’s opponents also notice one detail: Satoshi Nakamoto would certainly stand on the side of the Bitcoin community that would like to leave the BTC system in its original form. However, in a conversation with The Economist Wright drew a different picture: if Bitcoin power can be repeatedly scaled, then it will be able to replace not only all banking systems but many others, becoming a truly mainstream currency.
In this case, the regulation and support of such cryptocurrency would have to be taken up by large organizations — from banks, already interested in using blockchain technology, to entire states. If this happens, Bitcoin will really replace conventional currency but will lose its independence — the main reason for its creation.
Here are some interesting facts about Craig Wright:
  1. In the early 1990s, worked as a sauce cook at a French restaurant.
  2. Wright filed about 114 Blockchain-related patents since 2017
  3. Craig Wright has his own companies, for example, the Tulip Trading company, which has been very successful in developing supercomputers, as well as DeMorgan Ltd and Panopticrypt Pty Ltd, engaged in various operations with cryptocurrencies. But Wright’s main project is, of course, his own Bitcoin SV (Satoshi Vision), which appeared as a result of the fork of Bitcoin Cash in November 2018. The fork’s reason was the dissatisfaction of developers and miners with a size of the blockchain that was originally written in code. Transactions were processed very slowly, so Bitcoin Cash ABC appeared, where the size was increased to 8 megabytes. But this was not enough for Craig Wright, and he initiated the second fork, setting the block size to 128 megabytes in the currency he was in charge of.
  4. In February 2018 Wright was sued by David Kleiman — a computer scientist and cyber-security expert suspected to be one of the developers behind the Bitcoin and the blockchain tech. Kleiman said that Wright stole between 550,000 and 1,100,000 BTC.
  5. In 2018, Craig Wright was sued, accusing him of forging contracts and signatures in order to assign Bitcoins in the amount of $5 billion.
  6. In October 2017, Cointelegraph published a list of the most influential individuals from the blockchain industry. Not finding his name in it, Craig Wright appealed to the media with a comment about their negative mood regarding his personality. At the same time in the Cointelegraph ranking was the name Satoshi Nakamoto. This situation was noted as Wright’s recognition that he is not the creator of Bitcoin.
  7. Craig is suspected of repeatedly conducting operations to cash large amounts of BTC. During one of the checks, he brought the family from his native Sydney and moved to London to continue working and creating his own business.
What do you think about Craig Wright? Write your opinion in the comments below!
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium,Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoincirclejerk [link] [comments]

Bitcoin, an idea I think you should be a part of

I’m not immune to the weaknesses of Bitcoin - of which there are many. It’s not a panacea for all world problems - far from it. There’s a massive unknowable black hole that is the future and there’s absolutely no telling what may come of it, with nearly 8 billion actors each playing their own part on their own terms. I’m a realist through and through, and these limitations are what ground me.
But I can’t begin to express what the idea of Bitcoin has done to me. I know this isn’t the beginning. It’s one of a long chain of events that goes back to the first government on Earth and those who suffered under it. However in my opinion, Bitcoin has the potential to be second only to the Internet as the most extraordinary phenomenon of our lifetime. And this time around, we get to be a part of it from the very start.
Below is a quote from a thread on /economics where people (read: Keynesians and other status quo’ers) were bashing Bitcoin from every angle, and the responses weren’t quite adequate. This quote came in late in the game and rose to the top quickly - it seemed like people on both sides just started to “get it”:
The status quo is simply unacceptable. Companies such as paypal and visa have cornered the entire market for paying for things; goods and services, online - taking a good share of the money for doing very little, with them.
This is the internet and if you believe in some of the ideology that founded it and drives much of the major technology that it’s based on, you probably accept the need for open source software. In many ways bitcoin is similar. We absolutely NEED a secure, trustworthy way of exchanging money that companies, countries, banks and big business cannot mess with. Think of all that has happened in the last 10 years.
Moreover, behind bitcoin’s controversial and complex veneer are some truly nifty advancements in technology. For more than a while a big philosophical and technological hurdle to decentralizing network systems (be it computers, or people) has been the issue of trust: if there is no central authority, can we create a system in which most (51% or more) of the network can trust each other (see the two generals problem). The bitcoin methodology is one, fantastic solution that may have practical implications beyond currency (see the bitcoin DNS system or the new bitmessaging software to name but two).
Along with that advancement in trust and decentralization, bitcoin brings a great deal of features including anonymity (not guaranteed, but very possible), security, divisibility (for once, micro-transactions are truly possible) and portability (i.e. it can go anywhere the network reaches) to the way we trade.
So whilst for now it’s main use might be as a store of value, and that i can see, is questionable - ultimately its true test will be day to day transacting. There is a great deal more to do in order to make it easier to use for the average person - i.e. to develop and promote the software required for business and individuals to use it effectively. But we’ve come a long way in 5 short years.
But ultimately, bitcoin is a grand experiment, a test to see if crypto-currencies can work. It might fail, eventually, but be under no illusions that not too far from now, something similar will eventually become mainstream -> this is the future.
On a personal note, it’s also incredibly fascinating to watch and i’m rooting for it. [sic]
And that’s the crux, isn’t it? A grand experiment, a marriage of politics, philosophy, economics, and technology – and one whose legacy won’t soon be forgot.
Whether or not Bitcoin will become a global currency weapon crippling governments or die out as another innovative idea from an as-yet-undiscovered Achilles heel (or likely something in between), it has already won in so many ways. How so? Because it has shown those individuals who were intellectually prepared (people like us) that a game changer like this is more than just an anarchist’s wet dream.
Dan Kaminsky, a leading cryptographer and tech security specialist examined the Bitcoin source code and concluded that the infamous Satoshi Nakamoto was “a world-class programmer with a deep understanding of the C++ programming language” who understood “economics, cryptography, and peer-to-peer networking. Either there’s a team of people who worked on this or this guy is a genius.”
The following is a quote from Satoshi in response to another’s doubts, dated November 7, 2008 on the Cryptography Mailing List, where Bitcoin was born:
[Lengthy exposition of vulnerability of a system to use-of-force monopolies ellided.]
You will not find a solution to political problems in cryptography.
Yes, but we can win a major battle in the arms race and gain a new territory of freedom for several years.
I’m probably off my rocker at this point and succumbing to delusions of grandeur. I certainly wouldn’t be the first. But also… maybe not.
Paul Graham might have been talking specifically about startups when he said, “Live in the future, then build what’s missing,” but I’m taking heed to his words in a broader sense. We are young, intelligent, and (I’d like to believe) “get it”. Let’s be a part of the revolution. Let’s be generals in the next battle.
submitted by 3mergent to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Quotes about Bitcoin from Famous people

"[Bitcoin] is a techno tour de force." - Bill Gates, Founder of Microsoft
"You can't stop things like Bitcoin. It will be everywhere and the world will have to readjust. World governments will have to readjust" - John McAfee, Founder of McAfee
“It's money 2.0, a huge huge huge deal.” - Chamath Palihapitiya, Previous head of AOL instant messenger
“We have elected to put our money and faith in a mathematical framework that is free of politics and human error.” - Tyler Winklevoss, Co-creator of Facebook
“Entire classes of bugs are missing.” - Dan Kaminsky, Security Penetration Expert for Cisco and Avaya
“There are 3 eras of currency: Commodity based, politically based, and now, math based.” - Chris Dixon, Co-founder of Hunch now owned by Ebay, Co-founder of SiteAdvisor now owned by McAfee
“Right now Bitcoin feels like the Internet before the browser.” - Wences Casares, Founder of Banco Lemon, aquired by Banco do Brazil, Won Xbox game of the year for his game Assault Heroes
"Bitcoin will do to banks what email did to the postal industry" - Rick Falkvinge, Founder of the Swedish pirate party
"Bitcoin may be the TCP/IP of money." - Paul Buchheit, Creator of Gmail
“ I think the fact that within the bitcoin universe an algorithm replaces the functions of [the government] … is actually pretty cool. I am a big fan of Bitcoin” - Al Gore, 45th Vice President of the United States
"I am very intrigued by Bitcoin. It has all the signs. Paradigm shift, hackers love it, yet it's derided as a toy. Just like microcomputers." - Paul Graham, Creator of Yahoo Store
“I do think Bitcoin is the first [encrypted money] that has the potential to do something like change the world." - Peter Thiel, Co-Founder of Paypal
"I really like Bitcoin. I own Bitcoins. It's a store of value, a distributed ledger. It's a great place to put assets, especially in places like Argentina with 40 percent inflation, where $1 today is worth 60 cents in a year, and a government's currency does not hold value. It's also a good investment vehicle if you have an appetite for risk. But it won't be a currency until volatility slows down." - David Marcus, CEO of Paypal
“"[Virtual Currencies] may hold long-term promise, particularly if the innovations promote a faster, more secure and more efficient payment system.” " - Ben Bernanke, Chairman of the Federal Reserve
"Virgin Galactic is a bold entrepreneurial technology. It's driving a revolution and Bitcoin is doing just the same when it comes to inventing a new currency." - Sir Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Records, Virgin Galactic, and 400+ other businesses
"So bitcoin is cyber snob currency..." - William Shatner, Actor known for lead role in Star Trek TOS
"Bitcoin actually has the balance and incentives right, and that is why it is starting to take off" - Julian Assange, Founder of Wikileaks
"[Bitcoin] is a very exciting development, it might lead to a world currency. I think over the next decade it will grow to become one of the most important ways to pay for things and transfer assets." - Kim Dotcom, CEO of MegaUpload
"Bitcoin is a remarkable cryptographic achievement and the ability to create something that is not duplicable in the digital world has enormous value" - Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google
Any more you know? Put them in the comments! For each of these I found someone who's name or role in a company is generally known by the public who had something to say about Bitcoin.
submitted by imkharn to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A Bitcoin Tribute

---BEGIN TRIBUTE--- ./BitLen
::::::::::::::::::: :::::::.::.::.:.::: :.: :.' ' ' ' ' : : :.:'' ,,xiW,"4x, '' : ,dWWWXXXXi,4WX, ' dWWWXXX7" X, lWWWXX7 __ _ X :WWWXX7 ,xXX7' "X lWWWX7, .+,, _.+., :WWW7,."-" ,-' WW",X: X, "7Xl. (_x7' l ( :X: _ _ . " XX ,xxWWWWX7 )X- "" 4X" W X :Xi _,., WW X 4XiyXWWXd "" ,, 4XWWWWXX , R7X, "447^ R, "4RXk, , , TWk "4RXXi, X',x lTWk, "4RRR7' 4 XH :lWWWk, "4 ::TTXWWi, Xll :.. =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= LEN "rabbi" SASSAMA 1980-2011 Len was our friend. A brilliant mind, a kind soul, and a devious schemer; husband to Meredith brother to Calvin, son to Jim and Dana Hartshorn, coauthor and cofounder and Shmoo and so much more. We dedicate this silly hack to Len, who would have found it absolutely hilarious. --Dan Kaminsky, Travis Goodspeed P.S. My apologies, BitCoin people. He also would have LOL'd at BitCoin's new dependency upon ASCII BERNANKE :'::.:::::.:::.::.: : :.: ' ' ' ' : :': :.: ._ '.: : ," "x, : ' x7' 4, XX7 4XX XX XX Xl ,xxx, ,xxx,XX ( ' ,+o, | ,o+," 4 "-' X "-'" 7 l, ( )) ,X :Xx, ,xXXXxx,,XX 4XXiX'-__-XXXX' 4XXi, iXX7' , `4XXXXXXXXX^ _, Xx, ""XX7,xX W,"4WWx, ,XxWWX7' Xwi, "4WW7""4WW7',W TXXWw, 7 Xk 47 ,WH :TXXXWw, "), ,wWT: ::TTXXWWW lXl WWT: ----END TRIBUTE----
submitted by digdog303 to LibraryofBabel [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: posts from 2013-03-11 to 2013-04-23 14:57 PDT

Submissions % Comments %
Total 202 161
Unique Redditors 25 38
Upvotes 688 85% 290 89%
Downvotes 120 15% 35 11%

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 131 pts, 42 submissions: CollaborativeFund
    1. The rise of the sharing economy (9 pts, 2 comments)
    2. "In the past, thuggish and vexatious legal threats have been common because they've been risk-free. In the Information Age they aren't. When you act like a bully, you can become famous as a bully immediately, and reap the consequences." (8 pts, 0 comments)
    3. Disownership is the new normal. More than 50% of Americans have leased or borrowed a traditionally owned item in the last two years. (6 pts, 0 comments)
    4. How will driverless cars affect our cities? (6 pts, 0 comments)
    5. "What are the building blocks of being an engaged and active citizen?" One of the best comment threads I've ever seen. (6 pts, 0 comments)
    6. Data for the Boston Marathon Investigation Will Be Crowdsourced (6 pts, 4 comments)
  2. 88 pts, 34 submissions: d0gsbody
    1. Announcing: The Singularity Book Club (10 pts, 10 comments)
    2. How long will America keep jailing people to no real end? (9 pts, 1 comments)
    3. "Whatever rage you're feeling toward the perpetrator of this Boston attack, that's the rage in sustained form that people across the world feel toward the US for killing innocent people in their countries." (8 pts, 1 comments)
    4. Ask.SocialCitizens: How are the people here involved in their local community? What do you do to give back? (5 pts, 3 comments)
    5. What are the non-financial reasons for participating in collaborative consumption and being part of a collaborative consumption-based community? (4 pts, 0 comments)
    6. People trust other people who have a completed online profile more than they trust their neighbors (cheesy landing page, check out the report) (4 pts, 0 comments)
  3. 75 pts, 27 submissions: kevinmrr
    1. The Economist compares Bitcoin to Napster: "Even if it crashes, Bitcoin may make a dent in the financial world" (11 pts, 0 comments)
    2. Democratize Wealth Creation: Fascinating article about how American regulators are cutting 96% of the country out of the ability to invest in innovation. (7 pts, 4 comments)
    3. Some banks are starting to look at Facebook and LinkedIn Data in order to assess credit risk. Making racist comments on facebook may eventually determine whether you get that loan. (6 pts, 0 comments)
    4. We Should Measure Our Food In Exercise, Not In Calories (6 pts, 1 comments)
    5. The Empire acquires the rebel alliance: Mendeley users revolt against Elsevier takeover (4 pts, 0 comments)
    6. When I walk out of my house, I grab: Wallet, keys, cell phone. How much longer will it be until it's just cell phone? (4 pts, 3 comments)
  4. 65 pts, 21 submissions: janey42
    1. reddit's CEO explains why YouTube comments suck so much. (13 pts, 6 comments)
    2. Can someone explain to me the "big picture" implications of Google Fiber? (9 pts, 5 comments)
    3. The Price of Poor Communication: "While long thought of as a 'soft' science, communication is increasingly understood to be at the root of many of health care's failures - and a leading culprit in rising costs." (5 pts, 0 comments)
    4. Entering the deployment phase of our current technological revolution. (5 pts, 0 comments)
    5. I Tried Hacking Bitcoin and I Failed [x-post from Hacker News] (5 pts, 0 comments)
    6. Turning Vancouver into a Sharing Economy Laboratory (4 pts, 1 comments)
  5. 37 pts, 11 submissions: CatBaconNarwhal
    1. Ask.SocialCitizens: What are going to be the long-term effects of the obesity epidemic on America? Are there any (realistic) ways that we can reverse the trend as quickly as it began? (6 pts, 2 comments)
    2. How should we be preparing for the rise of collaborative consumption's impact on the labor markets? (6 pts, 2 comments)
    3. 250,000 English words still available as Twitter handles (6 pts, 5 comments)
    4. The Tyranny of Taxi Medallions (5 pts, 0 comments)
    5. "The Airbnb For Blah" analogy isn't going to go away (3 pts, 0 comments)
    6. You’re forking out $9,000 a year to own your car. (3 pts, 1 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. d0gsbody (54 pts, 42 comments)
  2. kevinmrr (27 pts, 25 comments)
  3. countmac01 (22 pts, 14 comments)
  4. craigshapiro (21 pts, 9 comments)
  5. CollaborativeFund (15 pts, 8 comments)
  6. alphacentauriAB (11 pts, 5 comments)
  7. Vaginal_Scrapings (10 pts, 5 comments)
  8. DanPierson (7 pts, 5 comments)
  9. DanteEstonia (7 pts, 4 comments)
  10. agentlame (6 pts, 1 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. reddit's CEO explains why YouTube comments suck so much. by janey42 (13 pts, 6 comments)
  2. The Economist compares Bitcoin to Napster: "Even if it crashes, Bitcoin may make a dent in the financial world" by kevinmrr (11 pts, 0 comments)
  3. The Boston Marathon attack gave me an idea for dealing with events like this in the future. by Vaginal_Scrapings (10 pts, 0 comments)
  4. This is the first time I've shared this idea with the general public - Reddit seems like the right place by WaterproofThis (10 pts, 4 comments)
  5. Announcing: The Singularity Book Club by d0gsbody (10 pts, 10 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 6 pts: agentlame's comment in reddit's CEO explains why YouTube comments suck so much.
  2. 5 pts: blinkergoesleft's comment in Announcing: The Singularity Book Club
  3. 5 pts: craigshapiro's comment in Can someone explain to me the "big picture" implications of Google Fiber?
  4. 4 pts: BloggingAlan's comment in reddit's CEO explains why YouTube comments suck so much.
  5. 3 pts: d0gsbody's comment in Uber, Data Darwinism and the future of work
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats SRS Marker: 1366754276.0
submitted by subreddit_stats to socialcitizens [link] [comments]

ASCII BERNANKE in the BlockChain

 LEN "rabbi" SASSAMA 1980-2011 Len was our friend. A brilliant mind, a kind soul, and a devious schemer; husband to Meredith brother to Calvin, son to Jim and Dana Hartshorn, coauthor and cofounder and Shmoo and so much more. We dedicate this silly hack to Len, who would have found it absolutely hilarious. --Dan Kaminsky, Travis Goodspeed P.S. My apologies, BitCoin people. He also would have LOL'd at BitCoin's new dependency upon ASCII BERNANKE :'::.:::::.:::.::.: : :.: ' ' ' ' : :': :.: _.__ '.: : _,^" "^x, : ' x7' `4, ^ ^^ XX7 4XX XX XX Xl ,xxx, ,xxx,XX ( ' _,+o, | ,o+," 4 "-^' X "^-'" 7 l, ( )) ,X :Xx,_ ,xXXXxx,_,XX 4XXiX'-___-`XXXX' 4XXi,_ _iXX7' , `4XXXXXXXXX^ _, Xx, ""^^^XX7,xX W,"4WWx,_ _,XxWWX7' Xwi, "4WW7""4WW7',W TXXWw, ^7 Xk 47 ,WH :TXXXWw,_ "), ,wWT: ::TTXXWWW lXl WWT: ----END TRIBUTE---- 
submitted by eN0Rm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: We Are the Hosts of the Let's Talk Bitcoin! Show! We just spent 4 days at Bitcoin2013, Ask Us Anything!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2013-05-24
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Hi all! I was wondering, what do you think it would take to get bitcoin from a niche currency used mainly by internet denizens to go mainstraim? I know the slow creep of more small companies accepting bitcoin helps, but what do you think that final cusp will be, and will it ever come to that? Thanks for taking the time to do this! There are several potential tipping points, but my favorite one is a large corporation accepting Bitcoin.
Amazon has an incredibly small operating margin, less than 1% - They have more than that in transaction costs, so if they were to accept Bitcoins for product and offer Bitcoins as payment to their affiliates it would cause a rush of other companies to jump onboard for the same reasons.
Once that happens with one large company, it sets a precedent. Doing something new is scary, and when the regulatory environment is uncertain like it is with Bitcoin the choice to accept could potentially cost you a lot of money later if it's retroactively made not OK and the value of the currency plummets.
But once a company like Amazon or Google jumps in, they have enough political swing and momentum that attacking Bitcoin becomes attacking them, and they'll fight that tooth and nail if it's saving them money.
Another example of a tipping point would be a country, ANY country, adopting it as their formal currency OR issuing a new currency with Bitcoins as the transparent backing of it. With bitcoin you can have a functional gold standard, because the gold doesn't need to be hidden from sight.
It is the hiding that makes gold standards dangerous - The people who issue currency with the gold as backing have no reason to issue the correct amount when only they know how much is out there, and how much gold they have.
I guess the Supreme Court has decided this does not apply to taxes, which is crap. Or are you talking about other countries? Thank you :) I actually mean something along the lines of "It is illegal to trade dollars for any cryptocurrency that does not have a real name and social security associated with it"
Will bitcoins ever be able to be traded like other recognized currencies in similar ways to Forex? More specifically, will there ever be retail brokers offering margin trading accounts that allow you to buy and sell bitcoin with leverage? There are already really small niche sites you can trade Bitcoin at leverage with, but it's just a bad idea. With a "normal" commodity market, like say chickens, if you think chickens are undervalued and want to profit from them you can buy forward production of say, a million chickens. Then when the option comes due, if you're on the profitable side of the trade you can essentially sell it for cash and the chickens never need to be delivered. In that way, it almost doesn't matter if the chickens ever existed to begin with because you never intended to take posession. With Bitcoin, it's different - Converting a bitcoin options contract into US dollars, yen, whatever actually is more expensive and time consuming than just "accepting delivery" of the bitcoins themselves. You can still sell them for whatever currency you want, but it is at the time of your choosing rather than at the point of settlement. What that means is that if you sell an option and the Bitcoins don't really exist, you could be screwed. You either default or buy them at market price which can be very painful given how volatile the pricing is right now. It is a bad idea to play with leverage in Bitcoin because if you lose, you potentially lose very big. Additionally, it's bad to buy an option because you introduce the possibility of the counterparty (supply) not being able to deliver, whereas if you just bought Bitcoins you have the Bitcoins.
Do you believe bitcoin is important locally as well as on the internet? If so, how are you promoting bitcoin in your local communities? Cryptocurrencies (of which Bitcoin is the most prominent) are the first real competition to the types of money we've used all our lives. With Dollars, Yen, Whatever - Ultimately there are a handful of people who get to decide how and why the currency should be managed.
If they did a good job, it might be fine - But the reality is the decision made affecting all users of the currency are to the benefit of a very few , at the cost of the many.
Bitcoin is different - The rules that govern it, are the rules that govern it. Nobody can break them, and if they're ever broken it's because more than 51% of the distributed power in the system (anyone can buy a mining rig and join this group). For me, that's incredibly important. Rules should apply evenly to everyone because otherwise they're not rules at all.
Local communities can benefit because it removes payment processors from merchant relationships, removes chargeback risk, and basically acts like Cash on the internet.
What are some of the more exciting things you (each of you?) envision for Bitcoin in the short to medium term? Discounts :) We've been talking about the deflationary business model, and during this period where the value is going to go up pretty fast (over the next several years) as adoption ramps up, businesses are going to be giving major discounts to those who choose to spend them.
From the merchants perspective, this is actually a huge win - They get to have lower prices than their US Dollar (or local currency) competitors, and the value of the Bitcoins they receive goes up over time instead of going down with printed currencies. Once this becomes pervasive in the Bitcoin economy, it will mean that even at those discounted prices they are STILL profitable because their suppliers are also offering them discounts to pay in Bitcoin.
Right now we're at the beginning of this cycle, you can see BitcoinStore.com is attempting it (Disclosure - They have sponsored us in the past, we run a 30s advertisement for them per show) but it's hard to be the first one doing it because it looks like you're sacrificing yourself when really it's just the model that makes the most sense.
Not to be the doom and gloom person but in the future what do you think will/would be the "last nail in the coffin" for Bitcoin? It depends what you mean by "last nail in the coffin"
How did you meet/find Andreas and Stephanie and how did you persuade them to be part of your show? I put out a call for staff several months ago, Andreas found me through that and joined the team initially as a correspondent providing expertise and commentary while Mt.Gox was having a lot of problems. Once we re-started the show as a twice-weekly, he graciously offered to join the hosting staff and gladly took him up on it.
I found Stephanie through her show Porc therapy, and a listener named Justus - He mentioned she did voicework, and I hired her to do some of our early introductions and advertising spots. When we went through the re-organization I offered her an occasional hosting role, and never bothered finding other hosts because I was so happy with our dynamic and varied viewpoints.
Both of the other hosts on the show are real professionals, and it's been my distinct pleasure to work with them.
Thanks for responding! Andreas is my fave (though I enjoy yours and Stephanie's comments too). Everybody has their favorite :) I think the fact that we all have people disagreeing with us at times means we're doing the job, and providing multiple and varied perspectives.
What recording tools are you using? We started off using Skype, Virtual Audio Cables (VAC) and Adobe Audition (creative suite)
Now we use Mumble instead of Skype, but the rest is the same.
I edit the host segments for content (sometimes we go on and on and on) and I edit the interviews for presentation, rarely removing any content. Many times the skillset that enables you to have a really smart idea is not the same skillset that lets you present that idea, perfectly, the first time. Our interview subjects tell me all the time "I love how smart I sound" and I get to say "You are smart, I just removed the brain processing noises"
Assuming bitcoin reaches critical mass, how does bitcoin cope with the criticism of rewarding early adopters? Do you see a potential uproar about inequity? Is there outrage against people who bought Apple stock at $30? Bitcoin is a currency that right now, and for the next few years, acting like an IPO. People who got in early got in cheap, but there was a whole lot of risk because people weren't using it much, there wern't vendors accepting it, so the use case is much more speculative.
We're very much still in the early adoption phase right now - Less than %.01 of internet users are Bitcoin users, as that number grows while the number of coins being added to the total pool grows at a much slower rate, the price per coin has to go up. If Bitcoin fails and everybody abandons it, this works the opposite way - but it actually solves a number of problems (microtransactions, fees, international money transfers, automated payment systems) so I'm not super concerned about that.
One of my favorite quotes, by Douglas Adams.
>It is a rare mind indeed that can render the hitherto non-existent >blindingly obvious. The cry 'I could have thought of that' is a very >popular and misleading one, for the fact is that they didn't, and a very >significant and revealing fact it is too.
What do you make of the download trend of the bitcoin client software in China? Isn't this a big story? China has lots of restrictive controls on their local currency, so Bitcoin has a real use case there. This is one of many scenarios where given even 1% adoption, the price must go very much above where it is now.
You commented on a recent episode about how Satochi Dice was going to block US traffic to the site due to uncertain regulations. Can't bitcoin work around that? If you send bitcoin to the addresses of the various bets - it still works right? Thanks for your show - I await each new podcast. Yes, if you already have the specific betting addresses it doesn't matter where you are in the world. It is only the website that does not allow US IPs, they did this to be very clear they were trying to respect the US gambling laws.
I spoke with Erik Voorhees about this among other things at the conference, you can find that interview here Link to letstalkbitcoin.com
I'd like to thank all three of you for doing this podcast, it's always thought provoking and fun to listen to. Plus, Stephanie does have a very sexy voice... But I do have a question, Right now, I don't know the answer to that question.
How do miners determine which transactions will be confirmed first and which get put to the back of the line? Shouldn't they be confirmed in a 'first come, first serve' basis? But the development team has made it clear they're moving towards a market-based mechanism where Miners set the minimum transaction fee they will accept, and process on a first-come/highest-fee model. People who want their transaction to process fast will put a higher fee and it will be prioritized, while people who don't care about delivery time will be able to send no fee and be subsidized by those paying higher fees.
*edit: As well, do you still plan on using some time on the show to go into more detail about mining? I think it was mentioned a few weeks ago that the topic might be explored in further detail. There will be fewer miners who accept free or very low fee transactions, so there you go.
How would Bitcoin change our financial system as we know it? In the same way the automobile changed the horse-and-buggy system as they knew it. If you play out the logic, one functionally obsoletes the other. I was talking with a financial reporter the other day who has been coming around to bitcoin, and he said to me "You know, if they were building the banking system from scratch today I think this is pretty close to what it would look like"
Andreas answered a question below about bitcoin and self driving cars, fixing spam on the internet by using Bitcoin addresses with tiny amounts of BTC in them to prove you're a real person and not a single-use bot, there are so many crazy and impossible things that become actually probable when you're talking in the context of a world built on decentralized, rules-based, cryptographically secured, instantly transmittable, person to person internet cash.
I have never been so hopeful for our future as I am now that I've thrown my days into bitcoin. Bitcoin 2013 was a fine conference and a wonderful experiance, so many very smart people have quit their jobs or left their studies to do the same thing I have.
We know we're building the future, and it's a better one than we have today.
Have any of you heard about how in Africa much of the exchange in value is done with mobile phone minutes? It seems to me - whatever the US attempts to do with Bitcoin - there will be other places that it will bubble up in. What about Argentina and other places where they actually understand what damage a desperate government can do to a currency? I would agree with you. Until recently it's been impossible to use Bitcoins on a "dumb cell phone" - That changed recently with Link to phoneacoin.com and others.
Bitcoin solves problems that the world has had for decades, it takes the power to destroy the currency away from government so they cannot do it no matter how much they want to, or how desperately they think they need to.
No government wants to destroy a currency, they just don't want to acknowledge they've trapped themselves with debt and have no way out.
Who invented Bitcoin? What is to stop whoever did so initially issuing themselves the equivalent of $79 zillion in Bitcoin currency prior to it taking off? Is there commission charged on each transaction that occurs? If so, how much, and who receives this? The true creator is not known, he went by a false name "Satoshi".
He actually holds about 250,000 coins if I recall correctly because he was the first miner. Bitcoin is a protocol, a set of rules. It's open source, and anyone who wants to look at it can see that there is not a mechanism to just create more coins by typing in a magic word. There are no commissions, although there are fees that go to the miners who process and verify transactions.
Great podcast, can't wait for the next one! It depends on the mesh. If the mesh was never connected to the internet, it would be a parralel Bitcoin network able to transact with itself but if it was ever connected to the larger network any conflicting transactions would be "lost" as the two ledgers (the big one, and the disconnected one) try to reckon their differences. Only one winner, so that means there is a loser.
You discussed mesh networks in 3rd world countries and how bitcoin could be used in such a scenario. If the [mesh] network is disconnected from the internet, how would transactions on the blockchain be verified? Couldn't the time the mesh network was disconnected make it vulnerable to hacking the [mesh network's] blockchain? More interesting might be disconnected communities running their own fork or version of Bitcoin, that way if they're ever connected it can be an exchange process (trading their coins for "bitcoins" rather than a reckoning (Seeing who has a bigger network and canceling out transactions on the smaller one that conflict)
1) The price for one Bitcoin seems to fluctuate quite a bit. The most successful currencies remain relatively stable over time (e.g. the Dollar). Will Bitcoin ever need to reach a certain level of stability to be a successful unit of trade? and if so, what do you think needs to happen before then? 1 - Yes! Once everyone who has purchased Bitcoin has purchased them, the price will stabilize. In practice this will start happening long before absolute stability, and as soon as people start thinking about prices in terms of BTC instead of their local currency it almost doesn't matter.
2) If Bitcoin ever becomes a widely accepted form of payment (seems a lot of businesses already accept it), how do you think the US government will proceed/react/regulate/etc. considering that technically only the feds can issue currency? 2 - "The Feds" are not the only ones who can issue currency - They have legal tender laws which mean people MUST accept their money, but nothing prevents you from circulating a voluntary currency like Bitcoin.
Do you foresee companies like paypal incorporating bitcoin into their businesses in the future as a more credible exchange than these ones that are currently running? No. Paypal again is the proverbial horse-drawn-buggy manufacturer- Sure they might go to the worlds faire and while observing the new fangled automobiles say to themselves 'we might integrate this into our existing machines!' when the fact is that it obsoletes those existing machines.
Paypal makes their money by standing in the middle of transactions collecting fees, Bitcoin serves its function by connecting people who want to do commerce directly to one-another, and what fees are paid are a tiny fraction of what Paypal does. If paypal accepted Bitcoin, it would not be Bitcoin any more because they would have mechanisms to freeze accounts at the very least to mitigate risk. That is not possible with Bitcoin by itself.
Thanks for the well thought out response, I genuinely appreciated that you took the time for this! I do have a follow up question, how does one get bit coin in an easy way? Lets say I have 300$ that I want in bit coin.. whats the best way to approach this? Probably a company like bitinstant.com, bitstamp.com, or btcquick.com - For larger amounts they don't make too much sense but at that level its your best bet.
Not to be rude, but how do you expect for a currency without a standard like gold silver etc. to not crash down in a blaze of glory? What standard is your currency backed by?
Hi There. I was at the San Jose convention hall last weekend attending Big Wow Comicfest and that's where I saw Bitcoin2013! Mostly Bitcoin 2013 was an opportunity for people building the future of Bitcoin to meet each other and network. There were speakers talking about a wide variety of issues, and vendors of Bitcoin services who were showing their latest innovations and systems.
What information was presented at this event that couldn't be done justice disseminated over the internet? The information will eventually be online, but the probably 200 people I got to meet in real life will not (in real life)
What resources do you think I should review as a total newbie to bitcoin? Or if possible, what's the one sentence pitch to get a newb involved? For people brand new, www.weusecoins.com is a good place to start For people who want to learn how it works, www.letstalkbitcoin.com/learn will direct you to the Bitcoin Education Project, which is a series of free and very high quality lectures that will tell you everything you ever wanted to know and more about Bitcoin, How it works, and all the little sub-topics that you'll eventually want to learn about.
The pitch is "It's like cash that lives on the internet, and is as easy to spend on the internet as buying a candybar in a store with a dollar"
Would any of you hazard a guess at the bitcoin exchange rate at the end of 2013? Sure, i'll make a wild guess.
$1000.
If and when a large user comes onboard, I think thats the next price at which we'll bounce around for a while, just like 100 became the sticky point after the last major bout of adoption.
How do bitcoins relate to the law? For example, what would be the crime if somone hacked your account and stole your bitcoins? It's not exactly theft of money, or is it? Bitcoins are your property, it's illegal for someone to steal your property whether it is money or not. Right now there is little that can be done about theft, but eventually I expect a class of "Blockchain Forensic Investigators" to emerge who will track down your stolen coins for a % based fee.
On your last show you mentioned the diversity of the Bitcoiners who attended BitCoin2013 - which nation was most represented in your opinion? Were there any Chinese nationals present (we've heard that they've suddenly gotten the bitcoin bug in the last month)? Did the other nations talk about regulatory problems or is that just a US concern? I met the gentleman from BTC-China, but other than that I actually didn't see any obvious chinese nationals. We saw lots of eastern europeans and south americans.
Other nations are not talking about the regulatory issue as far as I can tell, it seems like everyone is waiting to see what the US does, which is not abnormal in a very new situation like this.
Isn't having an inherently deflationary currency a terrible idea? How is bitcoin different from geeky goldbuggery? Because you can't divide a gold coin into .0001 without incurring cost and expense. That's not the case with Bitcoin, so the deflationary aspect of it is largely moot.
There is a tendency to listen to modern "economics" which makes this arguement, saying that the money supply must expand because otherwise it drives down profitability in a race to the bottom.
I think in practice we'll find that people don't work against their own best interest, and while during the initial adoptions stages of Bitcoin there will be significant discounts offered to those who pay with Bitcoin vs. legacy currency, once the market becomes saturated and the price levels out those discounts will be scaled way back.
Right now it makes sense to heavily discount, because the expectation is that the value of the Bitcoins will go up during this period of adoption, that won't always be true and the discount is a reflection of anticipated future returns.
Was it bad when people saved money in banks that paid 10% interest? No, that's called capital formation. There is a thought that given a deflationary currency nobody will spend any money, that's nonsense. Just because your currency gains value over time doesn't mean that you no longer have costs that must be paid for. What Deflationary currencies do is say "Ok, you could spend it on that, but is it worth it relative to what you'll gain by not?"
That's a good thing. Our system right now works on the opposite theory - Spend money NOW because if you're dumb enough to keep it in the bank it will actually lose value over time between the couple points of "official" inflation and less than 1% artifical interest rates. The situation is like this now because the fed is trying to make people spend as much money as possible with the hope that the flows will "restart the economic engine"
Too bad this isn't how things work, not that it'll stop us from trying it over and over again.
In the 2008 financial crash, govts bailed out the banks because there was no other way to maintain the whole financial ecosystems of payrolls, invoices and trade, all of which go through the banking system. Honestly? No. Bitcoin would be great in this role, but governments around the world rely on their ability to expand the money supply (print money, or sell debt) in order to fund their deficits. They also manipulate interest rates to be low so that debt is very inexpensive.
Can you envisage another financial crash in the future where govt says, "We don't need to do a bailout, as we've got this alternative payment system" and then instructs businesses and employees to just get themselves a bitcoin address and work through the Bitcoin system? Bitcoin doesn't have a central control mechanism, so there is no group or person who can say "OK - the interest rate is 1%" - If that's really what the interest rate wants to be based on market forces, it'll be that - But if not, there isn't much anyone can do to stop it.
What type of notes and agenda does the team coordinate on before a show? We use Basecamp, and it really depends. Right now we have a show prep thread that has 30+ posts in it for episode 11, we'll probably use 5 of those.
The agenda is really basic - As we get near recording time topics are selected (generally by me, but I like to get the other hosts to do it since they provide most of the commentary in Host segments) and I form a schedule, then we run through the recording session hitting each topic.
Over the last weeks we've brought two researchers onto the team, so that has helped a TON.
I first learned about Bitcoins on an episode of The Good Wife. The one with Jason Biggs as the creator of BitCoin. Have you watched that episode and how accurate does that episode portray what's happening with Bitcoin in terms of legal stuff? Not having seen it but knowing TV, I'm gonna go out on a limb and say "not very well" Satoshi has not been identified, was a throw-away identity that was cryptographically secured, so probably never will.
Are there any conferences in Chicago anytime soon? I think a Q&A in public would be helpful for your show as well as bitcoin. I'll be speaking at an event in NYC on July 30, there will be one or two meetups while I'm there. There is also an event in October in Atlanta. I remember talking with a guy at Bitcoin2013 wearing a shirt that said "BitcoinChicago" so I'd suggest looking for a user-group.
We're planning on doing Q&As often, but none of us are really near Chicago so it's tough. Happy to do virtual Q&As over skype, live or recorded.
Oh dear. You're not all perfectly grammatical orators on the first try? I'm crushed! I really value my own time, and I know other people out there do too. I try to make the show as information dense as possible, thats the criteria we've been operating under from really day one.
We're actually talking about cutting the show in half and releasing it more often (still recording the same amount) because people can get tired of listening to such dense content for an hour or more.
US Treasury recently issued a directive stating they would be monitoring any entity attempting to exchange virtual currency for USD (or any other currency, goods, or services), indicating that federal authorities take a dim view of what amounts to private coinage. Do you anticipate a Supreme Court case here defining what is and is not private coinage? 2.And given bitcoin's noted extra-legal uses, do you have any indication it is being decrypted by NSA? 3.Taking it a step further, do you think it could be a national security-sponsored international sieve for money laundering? It may eventually go to Supreme Court.
I think the market has done fine for bitcoin so far. I think the market will continue to take care of bitcoin. The idea of giving in willingly to regulation makes me cringe. There are two camps. Some people think that regulation is inevitable, and since it's going to happen anyways it's better to participate in the process and try to make it less bad. The other side thinks that by participating, you accept their authority to regulate it when really they have no right to regulate money and have proven to do a very bad job at it now for quite a number of years.
Thanks so much for doing this, I love the Bitcoin system, but hate the volatility. How do you recommend dealing with that? I've heard to convert it quickly to the currency of choice after any exchange has been made to avoid any more changes to the price. The easy solution is just buy and hold - If you need to buy something, do it when you need to and not before. Do not pre-order anything.
What is your prediction of the price for 1 btc in USD, exactly one year from now? Just for fun, since I know it is impossible to even guess the day to day price swings. As a wild guess number I'd say $1000 or less than a dollar. Very little middleground because if it's regulated out of existence it will still exist, but be hard to find and cheap - If adoption continues to path the price should accelerate with wild spikes up and down.
My partner is buying into bitcoin as well as litecoin. Any advice for him? (I personally don't understand it) Don't panic, invest for the long term, and don't buy any more than you can afford to lose 100% of because there are still things that could dramatically reduce the price of bitcoin (mostly regulatory stuff, I answered this elsewhere in the thread)
Hello, I just wrote a long post about the functions of using BTC to facilitate a 'free bank' using the principals of free money, similar to the WIR bank. Link to en.wikipedia.org Do you think that something like this would be possible using Bitcoin? Probably. Not really my area of expertise.
Why did bits take a dive at the same time gold took a tank? I don't pay attention to price, sorry.
We take full credit for any rise and blame others for any decline. Feel free to tip us from your gains! Lol.
Just wanted to say I love your show. I encourage you to please continue making high-quality podcast episodes. Thank you. I'm really excited to be able to be a journalist in such an exciting field in a time when journalism is under attack. Not sure if you've been following the so-called "AP scandal" but now is a weird time to be trying to report the truth in this world, and we couldn't have picked a more controversial topic to the global macro picture.
Bitcoins are the stupidest investment anyone could ever make. Pass. Link to static.quickmeme.com
Unfortunately, quickmeme doesn't let you copy image urls directly. Link to i.qkme.me
Yes, but they started being worth a set value. bitcoin was never backed by anything so its value was kind of made up. how do you expect to make a non goverment currency anybody with a computer can print to retain value? Because the pie is only so large, the more people who have computers devoted to the work just each get a smaller and smaller piece.
The rate of issuance for Bitcoin is currently 25 bitcoins every 10 minutes. Only one person or pool gets the whole 25 bitcoins, it's a race to find them. If there are 10 people looking, chances are pretty good you'll find some. If there are 100,000,000 people looking, chances are much less good that you'll find them first, but if there are that many people looking those 25 coins are probably worth a whole lot more.
The system is self balancing in this way, unlike the government currency system where they create 65 billion USD worth of new value every month to buy mortgage backed securities for face value to try and prop up the market. With more than a trillion USD being added in this way each year, how can a government currency retain its value?
Because the governments "pie" does infact have limits to making it, and only dropped gold standard after over 150 years of the doller having a defined worth, unlike bitcoin, where a random hacker can just print endless money. I'd direct you to security researcher Dan Kaminsky. Link to www.businessinsider.com
You'll find it's a little harder than you're describing. Like, impossible.
Last updated: 2013-05-29 11:06 UTC
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Dan Kaminsky - YouTube Dan Kaminsky Interview Part III Dan Kaminsky - YouTube Black Ops of TCP IP 2011 - Dan Kaminsky Dan Tyminski : The Boy Who Wouldn't Hoe Corn - YouTube

Some people were suspected of being Satoshi Nakamoto, like Gavin Andresen, Chief Scientist at the Bitcoin Foundation, as well as Dan Kaminsky. A recent revelation has led many to now suspect a man named Yasutaka Nakamoto, the drug runner of the 'King of Cocaine' himself, Pablo Escobar, as possibly being the real Satoshi Nakamoto. Yasutaka Nakamoto was the brother of Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto ... Bitcoin's got its issues. But it is not competing with perfection. NEWS; TOPICS; AUTHORS; QUOTE OF THE DAY; FAVORITES; LOG IN; Dan Kaminsky Quotes Bitcoin's got its issues. But it is not competing with perfection. Dan Kaminsky. Perfection; Got; Bitcoin ; Previous; Next; Quotes to Explore. Music was a big outlet for me. Being able to play an instrument and sing was definitely a good way for me ... Kaminsky nennt die Geschichte einen eindeutigen „Betrugsversuch“. Schon im Dezember 2015 hatte es Berichte gegeben , Wright sei der Erfinder oder einer der Erfinder von Bitcoin. News und Foren zu Computer, IT, Wissenschaft, Medien und Politik. Preisvergleich von Hardware und Software sowie Downloads bei Heise Medien. Dan Kaminsky On Bitcoin's Highlights And Flaws. I failed. This was very exciting. It is a fairly open secret that almost all systems can be hacked, somehow.. It is a less spoken of secret that ...

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Dan Kaminsky - YouTube

Dan Kaminsky Videos; Playlists; Channels; Discussion; About; Home Trending History Get YouTube Premium ... News Live Fashion Spotlight 360° Video Browse channels Sign in to like videos, comment ... Peter Silva of F5 finishes his chat with IOActive's Dan Kaminsky. Please see Part 1 for complete description. In this segment, DNSSEC conversation continues and Dan explains what's happened since ... The wonderful, charismatic bearded Dan Tyminski with an exquisite version of "The Boy Who Wouldn't Hoe Corn". In 2000, Dan Tyminski recorded a solo bluegrass... in 2013, a young couple decided to put Bitcoin (and themselves) to the ultimate test. If Bitcoin is going to change the world, it has to start with regular people using it every day. Bitcoin (BTC) Update! Blick auf die Charts und die News des Tages! 💰 $1090 Bonus bei ByBit sichern: https://www.bybit.com/app/register?affiliate_id=1873&lang...

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